Exit the Edu-Factory – a Call for Manuscripts | The Homeless Adjunct

Call for submissions

Source: Exit the Edu-Factory – a Call for Manuscripts | The Homeless Adjunct

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Redux: Contingency is Still Worse

NFM Board member Seth Kahn reiterates the obvious. We can’t say it enough, apparently.

Here comes trouble

In July 2014, I wrote a piece called The Worst Thing About Contingency is Contingency, which concluded:

[T]he pressure on tenure-track faculty simply isn’t comparable to the stress on contingent faculty whose jobs may shrink or disappear without notice or explanation; whose benefits, if there are any at all, are often tied to their teaching loads in such a way that losing a course could cost them much more than simply the lost salary (which already sucks)…. [T]hat risk is not as prominent for some contingent faculty as for others, but it’s never not there. Pre-tenured faculty at most institutions can, I realize, lose their positions in the first two or three years without cause, the risk of which is horrifically stressful, but even then–during the academic year, they’re guaranteed full-time work, full-time benefits, and full-time pay.

As long as contingent faculty jobs can be changed or taken away for…

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We also hurt our bargaining position when we devalue instructors of any kind

Seth Kahn on the dangers of devaluing our colleagues to administration.

Here comes trouble

In July 2015, I wrote a post called “We hurt our bargaining position when we devalue lower-division teaching,” arguing to an audience primarily of faculty that when we denigrate lower-division teaching assignments (e.g., I wish I didn’t have to teach these boring intro courses so I could teach these more interesting upper division and grad courses!), we make it easier for decision-makers to conclude that the work isn’t worth very much because we’re the ones telling them it isn’t worth very much. That post has been about as well-received as any I’ve written.

Yesterday on the WPA-l (listserv for writing instructors and program administrators), I made a sorta ham-fisted effort to extend that line of argument. It didn’t work especially well, so I want to try again. Because that conversation got so unraveled into so many different threads and subthreads, I’m not even going to try to summarize it…

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We Are the Ones

Jessica Lawless excerpts the new book she’s working on, outlining the painful intimidation adjuncts often endure even when trying to show solidarity with other faculty.

Cultural Capital Doesn't Pay the Rent

Like all of you who have been writing for, and reading, Cultural Capital Does’t Pay the Rent, I was thrown by the results of the presidential election. I went through a period of not being able to find my fight. Feeling old and tired and desiring nothing but to run away.

trump-hate-5_wm-620x4651 @boweryboogie

Then my own staff union, CWA 9404, started contract negotiations and my fight returned. Right now I am a worker fighting to ensure my union contract protects me when the organization I work for cuts it budget by 30% and national right to work laws are enacted. My daily work still feeds me intellectually, emotionally, financially. I’m lucky. But I’m also trying to understand why all the most powerful unions in the country didn’t have the foresight to back Bernie, or a back up plan if we got to the nightmare we have arrived at.

More than ever…

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Killing the Hungry Ghosts – Cultural Capital Doesn’t Pay the Rent

The unstoppable Bri Bolin on who we’re fighting in the War on Adjuncts, courtesy of equally badass Jessica Lawless’ new blog.


Those of you reading this are likely already helping to expose corruption and increase our visibility. As you know, adjuncts are still fairly invisible to the powers that be. The Higher Education P…

Source: Killing the Hungry Ghosts – Cultural Capital Doesn’t Pay the Rent